Resources

websites

  • ADRhub: news, events, blogs, and jobs portal for conflict resolution and peacebuilding www.adrhub.com
  • Alliance for Peacebuilding (AfP): network of peacebuilding and conflict resolution practitioners.
    www.allianceforpeacebuilding.org
  • Association for Conflict Resolution (ACR): US-based association for conflict resolution practitioners.
    www.acrnet.org
  • Beyond Intractibility: information and learning portal for peacebuilding and conflict resolution practitioners.
    www.beyondintractibility.org
  • Consensus Building Insitute (CBI): non-profit specialising in negotiation and dispute resolution. Founded by Lawrence Susskind, a pioneer and leader in consensus building. www.cbuilding.org
  • CDA Collaborative Learning Projects: non-profit specialising in research and advocacy to improve effectiveness of humanitarian assistance, peace builiding, and development. www.cdainc.com
  • CDR Associates: non-profit specialising in negotiation and dispute resolution. www.mediate.com
  • Centre for Humanitarian Dialogue (HD Centre): international organisation specialising in leadership-level mediation. www.hdcentre.com
  • Conciliation Resources (C-R): UK-based NGO supporting peacebuilding practitioners and initiatives around the world. www.c-r.com
  • Corporate Social Responsibility Initiative (CSRI): Harvard Kennedy School project to research and enhance public contributions of private enterprise. www.hks.harvard.edu/m-rcbg/CSRI/publications/workingpaper_1_nelson.pdf
  • Peace & Collaborative Development Network (PCDN): News, events, jobs, and learning portal for conflict resolution, peacebuilding and international development. www.internationalpeaceandconflict.org
  • Transcend International: Peacebuilding network conducting education programmes, research, advocacy and peacebuilding interventions. Founded by Johan Galtung, a pioneer in the peacebuilding field. www.transcend.org

case studies

 

videos online

 

Suggested Reading

  • Contemporary Conflict Resolution: (1999) by H. Miall, O. Ramsbotham & T. Woodhouse; Cambridge: Polity
  • Difficult Conversations: How to Discuss What Matters Most; (2000) by D. Stone, B. Patton & S. Heen.
  • Elusive Peace: How Modern Diplomatic Strategies Could Better Resolve World Conflicts; (2011) by D. E. Noll; Amherst: Prometheus Books.
  • Essentials of Negotiation, (2nd Ed): (2007/1997) by R.J. Lewicki, D.M. Saunders & J.W. Minton; Boston: McGraw-Hill Irwin.
  • Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In; (1981) by R. Fisher & W. Ury; New York: Penguin Books.
  • Herding Cats: Multiparty Mediation in a Complex World; (2003) by C.A. Crocker, F.O. Hampson & P. Aall; Washington D.C: USIP Press.
  • Managing Public Disputes: A Practical Guide for Government, Business, and Citizens’ Groups; (2001) by S.L. Carpenter & W.J.D. Kennedy.
  • The Handbook of Conflict Resolution: Theory and Practice; (2004) by M. Deutsch, P.T Coleman & E. Marcus; San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

META SPEAK

Politicians, businessmen, civic leaders, and even academics often bandy about terms like "dialogue," "negotiation," and "mediation" to convey attempts to "talk" or "discuss." As practitioners of Conlict Resolution, we cringe at their imprecise use of these terms. The danger of using these terms without precision, or to do so even interchangeably, is that both the public and key stakeholders (who have seen many "dialogues" and "negotiations" lounder) develop dialogue fatigue. Without having genuinely understood or even experienced a real Dialogue process, as we understand such a process, they come to believe that enough time and energy has been spent in "dialogue" without any appreciable result. Hence they conclude that "dialogue" does not work.